Friday, June 11, 2010

Element of the Day! - Friday, June 11, 2010

Who am I? I am a colorless, inert gas that, while common in the universe, I am rather rare on Earth. I am used in advertising signs and lights.

E-mail me with your answer.
dwilliams@reading.k12.ma.us
Include the element's chemical symbol.
Image from: global-b2b-network.com

Thursday, June 10, 2010

Element of the Day - Thursday, June 10, 2010

Who am I? I am a silver-gray metal. I have the highest atomic weight of the naturally occurring elements. When I am bombarded with slow neutrons, much heat can be generated and used for power and a source of material for nuclear weapons.

E-mail me with your answer at dwilliams@reading.k12.ma.us
Include the element's chemical symbol.
Image taken from: sustainablog.org

Wednesday, June 9, 2010

Element of the day - Wednesday, June 9th, 2010

Who am I? I am a colorless, oderles, non-toxic that is gas much lighter than air. I am the second most abundant and second lightest element in the known universe and am one of the elements believed to have been created in the Big Bang. I am used in balloons and blimps.

E-mail with your answer at dwilliams@reading.k12.ma.us
Include the element's chemical symbol.
Image taken from: abbmoonwalks.com

Tuesday, June 8, 2010

Element of the Day - Tuesday, June 8th

Who am I? I am a lustrous, sliver-colored metal that is very malleable. I am used in coins, photography, jewelry, and tableware. I am an excellent conductor of heat and electricity. E-mail me with your answer at:
dwilliams@reading.k12.ma.us
 Include the element's chemical symbol.

Image taken from: monex.com

Friday, June 4, 2010

Element of the Day - Friday June 4th

Who am I? Under regular conditions I am a dark-purple/dark-brown solid. I am primarily used in medicines to clean and disinfect wounds, photography, and in dyes. Table salt is often fortified with me. I am rare in the solar system and Earth's crust, however, compounds with me in them are very soluble in water and I am concentrated in seawater. I am necessary for the proper functioning of the thyroid gland in the human body.

E-mail me with your answer at dwilliams@reading.k12.ma.us
Include the element's chemical symbol in your answer.
Image taken from: http://www.bridgat.com/food_additives-b803_8.html

Thursday, June 3, 2010

Element of the Day - Thursday, June 3rd

Who am I? At room temperature I am a red liquid. I am the only non-metallic, liquid element. Compounds of me are used in fire retardants, some medicines, swimming pool maintenance, and photography. E-mail me with your answer at dwilliams@reading.k12.ma.us
 Include the element's chemical symbol.

Image taken from: aqua-pool-warehouse.com

Wednesday, June 2, 2010

Element of the Day - Wednesday, June 2nd

Who am I? I am a hard, slivery-white, grayish, magnetic metal. I have been used since ancient times. 30% of the world's supply of me comes from Canada. I am used in alloys, coins, magnets, some kinds of batteries, and plating (covering) other metals. E-mail me with your answer at dwilliams@reading.k12.ma.us
Include the element's chemical symbol.
Image taken from: wholesalebatteries.us

Tuesday, June 1, 2010

Hydrogen balloon


In today's activity we performed a single replacement chemical reaction. We mixed Zinc (Zn) with Hydrochloric acid (HCl) in side a 1,000ml Erlenmyer flask. When the reaction began, we put a balloon over the top of the flask to capture the gas. Some metals react with acids to produce hydrogen. The metal changes place with the hydrogen in the acid. The hydrogen is set free. Zinc is a metal that will react with Hydrochloric acid. This reaction produces. Zinc chloride (ZnCl2) and Hydrogen. video video

Element of the day - Tuesday, June 1st

Who am I? I am a strong, gray, magnetic metal used in the construction of buildings, steel, and machines. My density is 7.87 g/cm3. E-mail me with your answer at dwilliams@reading.k12.ma.us.
Include the element's chemical symbol.

Image taken from: mesh-wirecloth.com

Bird of the Week - XXXlV

This weeks "Bird of the Week" is the Chimney swift. A "flying cigar," the Chimney Swift is rarely seen perched. Its high-pitched twittering is a familiar sound during summertime as it flies high above, catching small flying insects. The Chimney swift has a fast, erratic flight. They are among the most aerial of birds, flying almost constantly except when at the nest or roosting at night. The Chimney Swift bathes in flight, gliding down to water, smacking the surface with its breast, then bouncing up and shaking the water from its plumage as it flies away. Chimney swifts feed on flying insects by pursuing the flying insects and catches them in their bill. They feeds in flocks or alone. Chimney swifts can devour over 1,000 insects in a day!

It's nest is a half saucer of woven small twigs held together with saliva. It's glued with saliva to inside wall of chimney.